People (2015-2016)

Directors

Professor James B. Jacobs (C.V.), is Chief Justice Warren E. Burger Professor of Constitutional Law and the Courts at NYU School of Law and a specialist in criminal law, criminal procedure and criminal justice.  Jacobs founded the Center in 1983. His primary research interests are organized crime, labor racketeering, prisons, and criminal records. Jacobs’ most recent books are The Eternal Criminal Record (Harvard University Press 2015) and  Breaking the Devil’s Pact: The Battle to Free the Teamsters from the Mob (NYU Press 2011) (co-author Kerry Cooperman).  In November 2011, Jacobs received the 2011 Distinguished Scholar Award from the International Association for the Study of Organized Crime. In April 2012, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to work on The Eternal Criminal Record.

Professor Jerome H. Skolnick (Emeritus).  At the end of the 2010-11 academic year, after fourteen years as the co-director of the Center, Skolnick retired.  Skolnick, a leading American criminal justice scholar and sociologist who has written extensively on policing and victimless crime, will continue his affiliation with the Center as a co-director Emeritus.

Visiting Fellows

Naomi Murakawa

Naomi Murakawa is an associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University, and she is currently a visiting fellow at the Center for Research in Crime and Justice at the NYU School of Law. She studies the reproduction of inequality in 20th and 21st century American politics, and her research focuses on racial criminalization and the politics of carceral expansion. She is the author of The First Civil Right: How Liberals Built Prison America (Oxford University Press), winner of the Michael Harrington Book Award from the American Political Science Association. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University, and previously she was an assistant professor in the programs of Law, Societies, and Justice and Political Science at the University of Washington. She has received fellowships from Columbia Law School’s Center for the Study of Law and Culture, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health Policy Research Program, and CUNY Graduate Center’s Advanced Research Collaborative.

Olena Sharvan

Olena studied international private law and international relations law in Kyiv (Ukraine) and Leuven (Belgium), receiving academic honors. She was awarded full-tuition merit-based scholarship for her law school studies in Ukraine. After graduation Olena worked as a finance lawyer in PricewaterhouseCoopers. She was admitted to the Kyiv regional bar in 2010, after which Olena worked as a senior associate in a leading Ukrainian law firm, Avellum Partners, specializing in cross-border finance and capital markets transactions. She is a recommended lawyer for banking and finance in Ukraine according to Chambers Europe and Legal500. At NYU School of Law, Olena pursued the specialized LLM in Corporation Law with a focus on corporate and securities laws.

Research Fellows

S. Andrew Schaffer

Andrew Schaffer S. has been a member of the faculty of the New York University School of Law since 1978, teaching primarily in the area of criminal procedure and currently also serves as a Senior Fellow in the Center for Research in Crime and Justice.

From 1977-2004 he also served as Senior Vice President and General Counsel of New York University and from 2005-2012 as general counsel of the New York City Police Department (“DeputyCommissioner for Legal Matters”).

Prior to joining New York University, he served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, including a one year interval as Assistant Chief Appellate attorney, as a litigator in private practice, as chief counsel to a New York State investigating commission, and as Associate Director of the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City.

He is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School and spent a year in residence at Cambridge University (Pembroke College) as a Henry Fellow.

David Eichenthal

David Eichenthal is a Managing Director with PFM Group’s Management and Budget Consulting practice based in Chattanooga, Tennessee.  Since November 2013, he has served as the day to day Executive Director of the Strong Cities Strong Communities National Resource Network, a White House initiative to provide comprehensive technical assistance and support to economically challenged cities.  Mr. Eichenthal previously served in a series of senior positions in local government over fifteen years in both Chattanooga and New York.

Mr. Eichenthal is the co-author of The Art of the Watchdog: Fighting Fraud, Waste, Abuse and Corruption in Government (SUNY Excelsior Press, 2014) and previously authored and co-authored chapters in Urban Politics: New York Style, ed. Dick Netzer and Jewel Bellush (M.E. Sharpe, 1990) and Innovations in E-Government: The Thoughts of Governors and Mayors, ed. Erwin A. Blackstone, Michael Bognanno and Simon Hakim (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005).  He has also published articles in the Annual Survey of American Law, Criminal Justice Quarterly, Government Finance Review, Government Law & Policy Journal, Prison Journal, Public Administration Review, Public Management and opinion pieces in Governing, New York Daily News, New York Newsday, Providence Journal and the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

 

Mr. Eichenthal has taught graduate and undergraduate level courses in American government, public policy, public administration and criminal justice at NYU, Georgia State University, Baruch College and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.  Mr. Eichenthal received his J.D. at the New York University School of Law and a BA degree from the University of Chicago in Public Policy Studies, cum laude.  He was a Harry S. Truman Scholar (New York State) and was admitted to practice law in the states of Tennessee and New York (now both inactive).

Nick Bravin

Eric Nick Bravin is a graduate of Stanford University and Columbia School of Law, where he was a Harlan Fisk Stone Scholar and twice a James Kent Scholar (presented to approximately the top 2% of the class). Mr. Bravin served as a law clerk to the Hon. David M. Ebel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit and to the Hon. Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the United States Supreme Court.

Mr. Bravin has taught constitutional law at the University of California School of Law (Boalt Hall) and has taught undergraduate courses about the Supreme Court and the Constitution (University of California’s Washington Program – UCDC). He recently completed a three-year term as an Acting Assistant Professor of Law at the New York University School of Law.

Along side Mr. Bravin’s academic engagements, he has continued to practice law, working on cases at every level of Federal and State court, as well as in mediations, arbitrations, and internal investigations. He has worked on complex civil and criminal matters, including representation of the individual named as “a person of interest” in the anthrax mailings of 2001.
Zoe Fuhr

Zoe Fuhr is a fellow at NYU School of Law’s Center for Research in Crime and Justice. She was awarded an LL.M as an Arthur T. Vanderbilt Scholar at NYU School of Law in June 2015. She has written a series of pieces with Professor James Jacobs on New York’s SAFE Act, and they are currently writing a book on the same topic. Before coming to NYU, she practiced as a trial attorney in New Zealand, and has also clerked for both the Chief High Court Judge of New Zealand and the Chief Justice of the Cook Islands. She has a Bachelor of Law (Hons) and Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Auckland.

Student Fellows
Paige Mankin

Administrator
Veronica Cruz

People (2014-2015)

Directors

Professor James B. Jacobs (C.V.), is Chief Justice Warren E. Burger Professor of Constitutional Law and the Courts at NYU School of Law and a specialist in criminal law, criminal procedure and criminal justice.  Jacobs founded the Center in 1983. His primary research interests are organized crime, labor racketeering, prisons, and criminal records. Jacobs’ most recent books are The Eternal Criminal Record (Harvard University Press 2015) and  Breaking the Devil’s Pact: The Battle to Free the Teamsters from the Mob (NYU Press 2011) (co-author Kerry Cooperman).  In November 2011, Jacobs received the 2011 Distinguished Scholar Award from the International Association for the Study of Organized Crime. In April 2012, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to work on The Eternal Criminal Record.

Professor Jerome H. Skolnick (Emeritus).  At the end of the 2010-11 academic year, after fourteen years as the co-director of the Center, Skolnick retired.  Skolnick, a leading American criminal justice scholar and sociologist who has written extensively on policing and victimless crime, will continue his affiliation with the Center as a co-director Emeritus.

Visiting Fellows

Miriam Baer
Miriam Baer is a Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, where she teaches subjects relating to criminal law and criminal procedure, white-collar crime, and corporations. Her scholarship, which explores the question of how best to deter organizational wrongdoing in public and private settings, has twice been selected for the prestigious Stanford-Yale-Harvard Junior Faculty Forum.  Her most recent article, Timing Brady, offers a novel explanation for why prosecutors fail to disclose exculpatory evidence to the defense, and will appear in the Columbia Law Review in January 2015.

Research Fellows

Michelle Miao
Michelle Miao’s comparative research project examines the links between the campaign against the death penalty and its collateral impact on the rise of long-term imprisonment in China and the US. Michelle has recently completed her Howard League post-doctoral fellow at Oxford University’s Centre for Criminology, studying the contradiction between European human rights influences and a rising trend of penal populism in the context of British penal politics. She completed her DPhil in Law at the University of Oxford in 2013. Her research interests are the intersections between the domains of criminology, human rights, socio-legal studies and international law.

Alison Mikkor
Alison Mikkor’s research interests center on responses under civil rights law to issues within this country’s prisons and jails.  Current projects, including the recent piece Correcting for Bias and Blind Spots in PLRA Exhaustion Law, 21 Geo. Mason Law Rev. 573 (2014), focus on the ways in which procedural rules can stymie positive improvements to corrections policy and interfere with prisoners’ access to justice.  Alison was formerly an Acting Assistant Professor in New York University School of Law’s Lawyering Program and litigated civil rights cases and complex federal cases for several years with a New York law firm. 

Student Fellows
Julia Gumpper
Deborah Prager
Diwaagar Radhakrishnan Sitaraman

Administrator
Monica Cortez